Dibuix

THE PROJECT
Examination Method

Direct observation plays a fundamental role in unravelling the wealth of information provided by the mural.

Expert eyes have scrutinised each and every centimetre of the painting and interpreted what they have seen ©MUHBA- Pere Vivas-Jordi Puig
OBSERVATION
EXPERT EYES HAVE SCRUTINISED EACH AND EVERY CENTIMETRE OF THE PAINTING AND INTERPRETED WHAT THEY HAVE SEEN.

Exploration of painting using the naked eye with the aid of raking light, a magnifying glass and microscope. During each examination, the restorer focussed her attention on one detail. Then the results were compared with the tests done using ultraviolet light and a camera that captures the appearance of the material when exposed to infrared light.

Each observation was situated precisely on a map using graphic codes.
Mapping out
EACH OBSERVATION WAS SITUATED PRECISELY ON A MAP USING GRAPHIC CODES TO REPORT THE RANGE OF ALTERATIONS IN THE MURAL.

The results of the observations were captures precisely and systematically in photographs and then computerised. They are not mere illustrations but rather a critical and analytical system that reveals the particular characteristics of the object under study.


>> See maps

The treatises on painting describe the techniques used by the painters and are essential reference material. ©MUHBA-Pep Parer
CONSULTATION OF PRIMARY SOURCES
The TREATISES ON PAINTING DESCRIBE THE TECHNIQUES USED BY THE PAINTERS AND ARE ESSENTIAL REFERENCE MATERIAL.

The maps contain the physical evidence and the treatises on painting provide written references. By crossing the data provided by the two sources it was possible to identify the techniques used. In this case, Il libro dell'arte, written by Cennino Cennini around 1390, has been invaluable.


>> See Cennino Cennini and Ferrer Bassa

Examination Method

Maps

Cennino Cennini and Ferrer Bassa

Il libro dell’arte, written by Cennino Cennini around 1390, is a compilation of the pictorial tradition of the school of Giotto, born a century earlier.

Then make snap lines with string using the same system and dimensions as you did previously on the plaster underneath.

[…] Then make snap lines with string using the same system and dimensions as you did previously on the plaster underneath. […] Cennino Cennini, Il libro dell’arte, c. LXVII

[…] And then put one point of the large compass on this line, and give the compass a half turn on the under side.  […]
Cennino Cennini, <i>Il libro dell’arte</i>, c. LXVII

[…] And then put one point of the large compass on this line, and give the compass a half turn on the under side. […] Cennino Cennini, Il libro dell’arte, c. LXVII

[…]after you have painted the figure in fresco, take a needle, and scratch around the outline of the head. […]
Cennino Cennini, <i>Il libro dell’arte</i>, c. CI

[…] after you have painted the figure in fresco, take a needle, and scratch around the outline of the head. […] Cennino Cennini, Il libro dell’arte, c. CI

[…] But first scratch in the plan of the folds with an iron nail or a needle.  […]
Cennino Cennini, <i>Il libro dell’arte</i>, c. LXXXIII

[…] But first scratch in the plan of the folds with an iron nail or a needle. […] Cennino Cennini, Il libro dell’arte, c. LXXXIII

[…] Then take a long ruler, straight and well made; and have it chamfered on one edge, so that it will not touch the wall, so that if you rub on it, or run along it with the brush and colour, it will not smudge things for you.  […]
Cennino Cennini, <i>Il libro dell’arte</i>, c. LXXXVII

[…] Then take a long ruler, straight and well made; and have it chamfered on one edge, so that it will not touch the wall, so that if you rub on it, or run along it with the brush and colour, it will not smudge things for you. […] Cennino Cennini, Il libro dell’arte, c. LXXXVII